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Save Energy, Money By Insulating Your Benicia Home

Sealing windows and adding insulation to your home can take as much as 30 percent off your heating bill, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Time is money, the old adage goes, but so is a well-winterized house. Stopping air leakages can take as much as 30 percent off your heating bill, according to the U.S. Department of Energy.

Check out these three tips for closing up air leaks around your home:

  1. First, do an energy audit of your house, keeping an eye out for the trouble spots. Windows and doors are obvious places to check, but also look at things like wall outlets and switches, plumbing vents and the attic hatch for leakage. Swaying curtains and light under your doors are sure signs, but you can find less obvious air leaks by using an infrared thermometer to check for temperature variations. Or use a lighted candle (carefully). If the flame moves, air is coming in.
  2. Seal the outside of windows with a good quality silicone caulk; use rope caulk on the inside (it can be removed in the spring). Or cover windows with a transparent film, using a hair dryer for adhesion. Other air leaks can be sealed with caulk or self-adhesive weather stripping.  
  3. Installing insulation yourself is not easy, but if you have an older home, chances are you need to add more. If the insulation is level with or below the floor joists, you should add more, according to Energy Star, a joint program of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Energy.  

How do you save energy around the house? Share your tips in the comments section below.

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Richard Bortolazzo February 09, 2013 at 02:47 PM
I am not so sure I want to insulate my home. I think it is unhealthful to completely seal off a home. From my reading on the subject, trapped air inside the structure eventually becomes less healthful than the fresh air outside. I think the home environment is much more appealing with some fresh air continually entering the home. And fresh air is free...
Michelle Kye February 11, 2013 at 05:42 PM
Again, local information is missing...does PG&E offer free inspections to help us identify areas where we could better conserve energy?

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